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Author Topic: Towards a Rate Guide for the Philippine Photography Industry  (Read 5585 times)

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Offline louiea

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I was requested to share this position paper on this forum. This paper came about as a result of discussions among the members of the Zoo - a forum of philippine editorial photographers who are also involved in commercial and advertising photography. The ball has started to roll towards this goal. Simultaneous with this, I have been having talks with the IPO (goverment office on Intellectual Property) and they are eager to help photographers out with regards to knowing and safeguarding their copyright ownership over their images. We are planning a seminar that the IPO will conduct for photographers. I am hoping that we will be able to launch the rate guide during the seminar... at least to start the major process of data gathering to be able to come up with rates that reflect the industry ideals and realities.

We are open to all the support possible. Please let us know of any ideas, suggestions, or if you want to volunteer for anything so that we know what resources we have available to get this to become a reality.


______________________________________________________________

TOWARDS A RATE GUIDE FOR THE PHILIPPINE PHOTOGRAPHY INDUSTRY


   The absence of a standard rate guide for photography services has been a constant dilemma for Philippine photographers. In recent years, as camera manufacturers have been making professional level digital cameras more and more affordable, the number of people entering professional photography has also been on the increase. As a result, with new photographers lacking any reference point for pricing, industry prices have been spiraling downward to the detriment of all who make their living from photography.

   Even many established photographers sometimes find themselves at a loss when determining how much to charge for a particular job. Fearing that we are charging way too low, or that we are charging too high that we might lose the project, sometimes causes us stress and leads us to seek advice from fellow photographers. Unfortunately, many of those we seek advice from are also quite uncertain if their own pricing scheme is right. Confusion is even heightened when we seek advice from two or more photographers and discover that all have pricing schemes so different from one another.

   Imagine then the situation of new photographers eager to enter the industry. With no reference to look to for pricing, they resort to pricing themselves so low.  This causes a devastating effect on the photography industry in general as it increasingly erodes the market value of our services and, with it, the respect for the profession as well. To a large extent, these new photographers can’t be blamed because there is no existing guide to base their prices on.

   Let me point out a few real life examples. February 2005, a client was asking for a quotation for a catalogue shoot for 200 products. All shots were to be done on simple white background and were estimated to be completed within 3 days. Due to the volume of work, quotes were entering in the range of P500-P1500 per product. Lowest quote totaled P100,000.00. Client was trying to negotiate as it was only willing to pay P70,000 for the whole project. All of a sudden, a new photographer won the bid as he charged an unbelievable P2,000 per pay. Imagine, the client who was willing to pay P70,000 got away with paying only P6,000 for the whole project. If only that photographer knew better. As a result, in the eyes of that client, P2,000 a day is what photography is worth!

   Summer 2004, a particular publication had a special project. Portraits of 20 people needed to be done within two days in the same location. The publication pegged the rate at P2,500 per layout which amounted to P50,000 for the whole project – a huge amount by local standards for editorial photography. Two days before the project, I was informed that I was being replaced as a new photographer offered to do the project at a rate of P1,250 only. I figured that at P25,000 for the project, it would still be a good rate based on our low editorial rates. Unfortunately, I found out that the photographer did not charge P1,250 per layout but charged P1,250 per day! The publication got their requirement done at ten percent the amount they were willing to pay. Horrified at this I talked to the photographer and found out that he had no idea how much to charge nor how much the magazine was willing to pay. He had recently quit his P400 a day job and decided to do photography professionally. At P1,250 a day doing photography, he thought he was doing well.

   The stories of woe from photographers are plentiful nowadays. Competition has been getting more numerous with prices getting lower. It is high time that a rate guide for the Philippine photography industry be developed to safeguard photography as a viable profession.

PROPOSAL

   A Philippine Photographer’s Rate Guide could be a solution to help standardize and control the industry rates for professional photography services. Such a Rate Guide could be made universally accessible via a web page on the internet and would serve as a reference point not only for photographers but even for all clients when there is a need to determine pricing for professional photography requirements.

Objectives
1.   Protect the photography industry by providing a reference guide for photographers with regards to pricing for various photographic services.
2.   Protects the photography industry by informing photographers of their rights and other industry practices.
3.   Protects the photography industry by providing information regarding industry rates, practices, and photographer’s rights to clients in need of various photography requirements.






Form

   Imagine a website housing the Philippine Photographer’s Rate Guide. When a photographer has a particular assignment and is uncertain on how to price it, he can visit the site and search the category of the type of photography service he is to render. He can then find ranges of prices he can charge depending on the type of photography and its intended usage. So if he is doing product photography for press release purposes, he can find the suggested industry prices for such a service. If he is doing food photography to be used for a billboard, he will likewise find a specific pricing for this service.

   Since experience and specialization play a big factor in determining pricing, we will set price ranges in 3 tiers – low, medium, and high. It will be up to each photographer to determine what price range he fits in based on his expertise and experience. For example, a new photographer would most likely base his prices on the ‘low’ ranges as he still gains experience and develops his skills. A veteran fashion photographer might peg his rates at the ‘high’ range but might opt to peg his price at the ‘middle’ range if asked to do food photography which he is not as adept at.

   Since various ways of pricing such as per layout/set-up, per hour, and per day are schemes often used, we hope to come up with a rate guide addressing all these categories.

   On the same site, we hope to have information regarding photographer’s rights, ways to protect and enforce these rights, and other information on industry practices. Hopefully, other guides or tips which can help photographer’s professionalize their craft would also be on the site.

Method

   How to come up with the proposed rate guides is the big question. Some form of survey among the practicing professional photographers will be necessary to come up with generally acceptable categories and rates. Definitely a monumental task, but it is one that is necessary. We are definitely open for suggestions and open for membership for a working committee to put this to task.





Frequently Asked Questions:


1.   Is the rate guide supposed to be a rule that should be followed by all photographers? – No, it is meant to be a guide based on present industry conditions. With the absence of a truly industry wide association, and with the constant influx of new photographers, there is no mechanism to make it a mandatory rule to be followed. The best it can be is a reference for photographers to base their pricing on that they may achieve fair compensation for their work and at the same time protect the industry.

2.   How will this stop photographers from under pricing? – It won’t, but it can at least discourage and limit it. Reality is that some photographers are put into situations wherein they sometimes have to under price for economic reasons.  The rate guide gives not only a standard reference but also an aspiration that many photographers may wish to target. Thus, if a photographer chooses to under price, the rate guide will encourage him to not stray too far from the standards. For example: if a photographer is quoting for a particular job and he discovers that the minimum industry rate is P10,000, if he does choose to under price, he might opt to quote P8,000 instead. Without a rate guide, he might have quoted a low P2,000.  Knowing that the going rate is P10,000, most people would aspire to come as close to that as possible and may even feel cheated if they went too much lower. Photographers may be emboldened thinking if other photographers get paid at those rates, why does he deserve any less?

3.   How can this help photographers convince their clients that the prices they quote are reasonable? – So often, many photographers hear from clients that the prices they quoted are way too expensive, yet the photographer has already bent over backwards giving them really low rates. Aside from wanting to get the lowest rate possible, there are two basic reasons that this happens: because clients have no idea of what photography industry rates are and because they have encountered other photographers that have charged lower rates. The rate guide, being accessible on the internet becomes an excellent information dissemination tool which photographers can point out to clients. For example: a client tells a photographer that his rate of P10,000 for a particular project is way too high. The photographer checked that industry rates range from P10,000-20,000 for that particular job and he has already opted to charge the lowest rate. He can now argue with confidence that he is giving the client the lowest rate possible. He can further punctuate his stand by having the client check the industry price range at the rate guide web site. This then serves to inform the client of present industry rates and could help condition him to accept the fair rate. The presence of this guide may also be helpful in another way. Let’s say the client still wants to get a lower rate and tries contacting another photographer. Chances are, this other photographer will refer to the same rate guide and quote within the same range. This will aid to further convince the client to accept the proposed rates.

4.   How will this prevent new photographers from pricing too low? – Many new photographers are faced with the dilemma of not knowing how much the value of photography services are. By making the rate guide web site an industry wide standard, we hope that all new photographers will look to it as a reference for pricing. Most of these new photographers will aspire for the high rates and will most likely try to quote within the price range or as close to it as possible. One main benefit of the rate guide is to arm photographers with the confidence to quote the rates they deserve.


5.   How about dealing with clients that are economically challenged? – We will sometimes come across clients that cannot afford the standard rates. There might be non-profit organizations, very small businesses, or other individuals or establishments that we know may not be able to afford standard rates. The rate guide still serves its purpose as a peg for photographers to base their prices on. Hopefully, one of the low ranges of one of the schemes (per hour, per day, per layout, etc) will be acceptable. If the photographer finds out that even these rates are too high for that particular client, he can give concessions out of his own generosity but should emphasize the going industry rate that he should have charged. That way, we can still promote the industry rates and maintain the respect for photography as a service of value.

6.   Why do we need to have different price ranges? – Not all photographers are of equal experience and expertise. Not all clients have the same requirements in terms of quality and budget. Some clients may need very high quality images made with proficient technical skill and superb creative execution. Many others have very basic photography requirements that even new professional photographers can easily handle. It becomes essential to have a wide range of price schemes and ranges to meet the various needs of the market.


7.   How do I determine which price range I would fall under? – There will be 3 basic price ranges: low, middle, and high. Only the photographer himself can determine which price range he can charge depending on his level of experience and expertise. The photographer must be sensitive in the general client reaction to his practice. If he finds that he is more and more sought after for the quality of his work or his particular expertise, then this can be an indication that he could opt for a higher price range. A photographer may also vary his price range depending on his particular expertise. For example: a renowned portrait photographer, who might be able to fetch the highest prices for portrait jobs, might opt to take a low or medium price range if pricing for a jewelry photography job that he is not as experienced or adept in.



Louie Aguinaldo
April 2006
louiea@iname.com
09175295706


**Edited All Caps Lock Title**
« Last Edit: July 18, 2006, 11:30:19 PM by wheelee »

Pinoy Photography - Philippines Online Photography Community


Offline rench

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Re: TOWARDS A RATE GUIDE FOR THE PHILIPPINE PHOTOGRAPHY INDUSTRY
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2006, 10:42:33 PM »
sir louie,

there is an interesting post in the forums that discussess the same topic:
http://www.pinoyphotography.org/forum/index.php?topic=13.0 (Topic: The going rates...)

I think your initiative is a step in the right direction.  Ideally we should compete in terms of vision, talent and service first before we compete in terms of price.  It would be very useful for people like myself who get asked to take photos but am not sure what to quote.

 


Offline clicko

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Re: Towards a Rate Guide for the Philippine Photography Industry
« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2006, 09:37:23 AM »
maraming salamat po for sharing.
This will surely help a lot of us.. ;D

Offline harvey

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Re: Towards a Rate Guide for the Philippine Photography Industry
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2006, 11:32:55 PM »
Dear Louie,

Thanks for initiating this project.

How may I help? Maybe we can invite about 10 photographers for a round-table discussion on pricing. I have some books to share. You may also want to check out Blinkbid or Fotoquote. These are cost estimating services for photographers in the U.S.

Good luck,
Harvey
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Offline coal

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Re: Towards a Rate Guide for the Philippine Photography Industry
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2006, 06:37:34 PM »
Mr. Louie,
Your point of view is very good and convincing,  site that would host the benchmark pricing is likewise ideal.  I hope they will push through.   

Ms. Harvey's suggestion of focus group or round table discussion would be a good start.    having sort of tariff guide would somehow professionalize the photography industry and create standards. 

I'm not a pro yet,  I do photography as a hobby and something on the side.  but it will certainly help having a guide. 

cocoy

Offline frontline_shooter

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Re: Towards a Rate Guide for the Philippine Photography Industry
« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2006, 07:29:31 PM »
This is a fantastic idea but I don't know if it would ever work in our country.

There is a similar web site for American photographer's http://photographersindex.com/stockprice.htm

I would like to think this would work for us but...............

FL

Offline danz11515

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Re: Towards a Rate Guide for the Philippine Photography Industry
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2007, 10:19:14 AM »
I hope this project works.... we could atleast try to make it work.

Offline harry5388

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Re: Towards a Rate Guide for the Philippine Photography Industry
« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2007, 03:07:54 PM »
This is great! i might consider photography as a profession in the near future if this project pushes through... ;D
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Offline ZD5

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Re: Towards a Rate Guide for the Philippine Photography Industry
« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2009, 05:50:22 PM »
Reviving this topic as I think it still needs an update. With the recent post of Louie, he could probably give us an update of this topic so everyone in the forum would be enlighted.

Thanks,

Topy Manalo

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Re: Towards a Rate Guide for the Philippine Photography Industry
« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2009, 06:21:54 PM »
problema din kasi is minsan ayaw din kasi mag share ng rates ang mga mas matagal na sa trabaho e. sila rin may kagagawan nyan. kung mas open lang sana yun iba dyan sa pagmentor eh di sana hindi magkaka ganyan? hindi ko naman sinasabi na suplado lahat pero kailangan lang talaga ng open advice sa mga naguumpisa para maiwasan ang ganito. no offense ha. at wala din ako pinapatamaan since di pa naman ako tumanong ng rates  ;D ang basehan ko ng rates is yun photography studio sa baba namin na weddings ang ginagawa :) and yes,nasisira negosyo nila sa mga freelancers na super baba maningil. :o :o sana isipin din nila yun na invest nilang gear bago sila mag presyo

Offline ZD5

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Re: Towards a Rate Guide for the Philippine Photography Industry
« Reply #10 on: February 03, 2009, 06:45:46 PM »
problema din kasi is minsan ayaw din kasi mag share ng rates ang mga mas matagal na sa trabaho e. sila rin may kagagawan nyan. kung mas open lang sana yun iba dyan sa pagmentor eh di sana hindi magkaka ganyan? hindi ko naman sinasabi na suplado lahat pero kailangan lang talaga ng open advice sa mga naguumpisa para maiwasan ang ganito. no offense ha. at wala din ako pinapatamaan since di pa naman ako tumanong ng rates  ;D ang basehan ko ng rates is yun photography studio sa baba namin na weddings ang ginagawa :) and yes,nasisira negosyo nila sa mga freelancers na super baba maningil. :o :o sana isipin din nila yun na invest nilang gear bago sila mag presyo

At this point, I think pointing fingers will not help at all. You cannot blame the PROs, they have all their reason not to divulge that information for the purpose of protecting ther market value. But if there will be an initiating body, they will comply to it as to protect their rates. That is the reason why I revived the thread, hopefully most of the readers here will see this as an eye opener rather than putting fuel into the fire.

 :)

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Re: Towards a Rate Guide for the Philippine Photography Industry
« Reply #11 on: February 03, 2009, 10:01:55 PM »
neither can we blame the guys that are just starting  :P
they can share without the need to disclose their personal talent fees. giving the right bracket should be the right way... :-*
thanks for reviving this thread. dapat lang talaga maging aware lahat sa mga rates,para di maabuso

Offline louiea

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Re: Towards a Rate Guide for the Philippine Photography Industry
« Reply #12 on: February 03, 2009, 10:08:52 PM »
Sadly not much development has happened with this rate guide for a number of reasons.

1. Sidetracked by other issues that we got involved in, like the campaign to safeguard our rights as photographers, the contract negotiations with publications, and now my new campaign to get photographers categorized as 'artists' so that we can get the same tax benefits that artists get.
2. When I tried to work on this, a lot of my colleagues were very supportive. Initially meetings were well attended, but as time went on the numbers dwindled. Until there was a time it was only Raymond Isaac and I that showed up. I guess a lot of people got busy.
3. The models to base pricing on was so varied that it was very difficult to get started. There were those who worked on a per project package pricing, some on a per layout/set-up rate, some on a day rate, some on an hourly rate, others also considered variables such as usage, duration of usage, the media it would be used for, etc. Since the first step was to survey the actual pricing landscape to come up with a set of averages, we got stuck since there were just too many formats to deal with. In other words, creating a template to survey the present pricing schemes used by photographers needed so much work and brainstorming to work it out that we got stuck there.

So far, even a lot of my colleagues are uncertain of the prices they quote. Until now, a number of us consult with each other when we have certain jobs and are not sure how to price them.

Ok, I realize I have to get this going once again. But let me finish the one I'm working with now to get photographers categorized as artists. In a week or two, the petition will be submitted for ruling. And I'm praying it will be in our favor.

Anyway, if there are some newbies that need to consult about pricing, feel free to contact me and I can try to help you by giving an overview of what I have learned from my surveys so far to come up with a rate guide. I don't have a clear standard ready but I can at least share some of the models some pros use when they quote.  louieaguinaldo@gmail.com or 09175295706

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Re: Towards a Rate Guide for the Philippine Photography Industry
« Reply #13 on: February 03, 2009, 10:37:50 PM »
Hey Louie, thanks for the effort. I agree that this is a trip-to-the-moon thing... But if we all pursue on the objective and look at it in a positive way, it will be doable.  :)

@ pitbull,

No one is blaming nobody here, what your saying is true but some PROs became "selfish" at some point due to the "guys that are starting" kinda thing. What they do is they ask the PROs of their rates, and use it as a basis... Good intention, I would say... But the bad part is when they slash the rates up to 60% shamelessly with the intention to cut the other photographer and commissioned the work to them.

My rule of thumb, If I am not sure on how to quote or price a certain job, I ask here at the forum on standard rates, different photographers to get the average. Then I ask the client to scout for prices, and if they don't mind, they show me the cheapest package that they find. Once they give me their quoted price, I will cross check it with the average price that I gathered and see if it's justifiable. Then I will either:

1. Give them the same price with additional freebies or extras or...
2. Give them the same package in a lower price, based from the average price that I gathered and their quotation.

There are cases that I will encounter a price lower than I am expecting, what I do is I tell the client to get it since it's really low and that I cannot go lower than that. As Ken Go told us during our lighting workshop: Your market value will depend on how you market yourself plus the output that you can give. If you continue to settle at a cheap price, you'll have a hard time to charge higher as you go along, even if your output is comparable to the PROs. But if you start charging at a standard rate, as you go along, you can compete fair and square with the PROs, it will just be a matter of Marketing and Skills.

 :)

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Re: Towards a Rate Guide for the Philippine Photography Industry
« Reply #14 on: February 03, 2009, 11:28:14 PM »
i totally support this move, its a difficult task but i hope it happens sooner than later...

;)



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Re: Towards a Rate Guide for the Philippine Photography Industry
« Reply #15 on: February 04, 2009, 07:16:29 AM »
Well I am not a Photographer, I am a Nutritional Chemist. I am a hobbyist though.

When I first started clicking shutter on my DSLR, I was so impressed by the detail and far more beautiful images I produce compared to my P&S. I decided to further improve my skills and expand my gear so as to have future family events a personal touch.

A few years back I use to make some analyses of various vitamins in a minimum of 2 days. To rush things, like Industry standard always is, I needed another Chemist to continue my work after my rendered Laboratory Hours. Then a new Scientific Instrument came, one with higher throughput and at a much cheaper cost. I was happy that I can do more and accomplish more in a single days work compared to the previous setup whence I needed another person to do the same.

Insight:

Some Chemists lost their opportunity to earn money because a new Machine does their job faster and cheaper.

Technically, Some Photographers lost their opportunity to earn a living FROM ME, because I chose to do the job myself and because I have the tools and AMPLE knowledge to do so.

Come to think of it, as the DSLR industry became consumer related ( aww, come'on admit it! D90 video?? ) the craft and art of Photography previously available to some professionals trying to earn a living is now ubiquitously available to everyone willing to ride the bandwagon. Just like our generations fad; Cellphones, DOTA, ecstasy, body piercing, lowered suspensions, EMO culture, IPOD, PSP, dance revo... the lists goes one ( dont get me started with BAGETS, MENUDO, SWATCH, pager ...).

Fad Fades.

Passion endures.

But while the enthusiasm is alive, try not to step on someone else's toes. Try not to scavenge opportunity from someone else because Bragging rights for accomplishing a project fades but the dent that was made to the Professional Photographers business prospects is forever.

From the story by the Thread Starter, those mentioned companies/publications would never shell out 5 digit projects as plan A in the future, they will try to find some enthusiast who will do the job for a dime a dozen and with a smile. Bragging Rights? Bring it on!

Successful Businesses try not to kill competitors by  continually bring down price benchmarks. They sit down over a cup of coffee, discuss wallstreet, forex, economy and at the end of the day, they agree to fix prices mutually agreeable to everyone in the business. No wonder, Store A has virtually the same price as Store B and Store C.

Those that bring the price down TO HOG consumers tend to earn MORE and MUCH MORE but usually leaving a trail of destruction and ruin in their path ( the business kind of way! ).

What was the term here? anybody? Oh I remember...

ETHICS.

this is just my opinion, anyone can flame me but pay respect to the forum and tread starter, do it by PM instead. I dont bite. Im just concerned. ;)

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Re: Towards a Rate Guide for the Philippine Photography Industry
« Reply #16 on: February 04, 2009, 02:49:36 PM »
Well I am not a Photographer, I am a Nutritional Chemist. I am a hobbyist though.

When I first started clicking shutter on my DSLR, I was so impressed by the detail and far more beautiful images I produce compared to my P&S. I decided to further improve my skills and expand my gear so as to have future family events a personal touch.

A few years back I use to make some analyses of various vitamins in a minimum of 2 days. To rush things, like Industry standard always is, I needed another Chemist to continue my work after my rendered Laboratory Hours. Then a new Scientific Instrument came, one with higher throughput and at a much cheaper cost. I was happy that I can do more and accomplish more in a single days work compared to the previous setup whence I needed another person to do the same.

Insight:

Some Chemists lost their opportunity to earn money because a new Machine does their job faster and cheaper.

Technically, Some Photographers lost their opportunity to earn a living FROM ME, because I chose to do the job myself and because I have the tools and AMPLE knowledge to do so.

Come to think of it, as the DSLR industry became consumer related ( aww, come'on admit it! D90 video?? ) the craft and art of Photography previously available to some professionals trying to earn a living is now ubiquitously available to everyone willing to ride the bandwagon. Just like our generations fad; Cellphones, DOTA, ecstasy, body piercing, lowered suspensions, EMO culture, IPOD, PSP, dance revo... the lists goes one ( dont get me started with BAGETS, MENUDO, SWATCH, pager ...).

Fad Fades.

Passion endures.

But while the enthusiasm is alive, try not to step on someone else's toes. Try not to scavenge opportunity from someone else because Bragging rights for accomplishing a project fades but the dent that was made to the Professional Photographers business prospects is forever.

From the story by the Thread Starter, those mentioned companies/publications would never shell out 5 digit projects as plan A in the future, they will try to find some enthusiast who will do the job for a dime a dozen and with a smile. Bragging Rights? Bring it on!

Successful Businesses try not to kill competitors by  continually bring down price benchmarks. They sit down over a cup of coffee, discuss wallstreet, forex, economy and at the end of the day, they agree to fix prices mutually agreeable to everyone in the business. No wonder, Store A has virtually the same price as Store B and Store C.

Those that bring the price down TO HOG consumers tend to earn MORE and MUCH MORE but usually leaving a trail of destruction and ruin in their path ( the business kind of way! ).

What was the term here? anybody? Oh I remember...

ETHICS.

this is just my opinion, anyone can flame me but pay respect to the forum and tread starter, do it by PM instead. I dont bite. Im just concerned. ;)

VIRTUS JUNXIT, MORS NON SEPARBIT

+1 on this, love the "ETHICS" thing, it summarizes everything.  :)

Offline vulcanraven

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Re: Towards a Rate Guide for the Philippine Photography Industry
« Reply #17 on: February 04, 2009, 03:04:16 PM »
With our beloved Craft being common as tabloid papers nowadays, a  Registered Union or Org will probably be a necessity. It will protect Hobbyists, Professionals and even Plain Consumers from Capitalizing B@$tarD$.

I dont know the Law and Rights thing, but I do know that when a Hanapbuhay gets hurt, it is indeed a serious matter.

Noobs will always try to prove their worth. It is not their Fault. It is however a different matter when Big Companies prey on them. A unified order will help, will not make the matter foolproof, but surely helps. Think Light Meter in our DSLR. O ha, ganda methapor.

My sympathies to those who earn an honest buck.
Nikon, Canon, Panasonic : Digital and Film
Domke and NatGeo : Sucker for Canvass

Offline mckytm

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Re: Towards a Rate Guide for the Philippine Photography Industry
« Reply #18 on: February 04, 2009, 06:43:23 PM »
Successful Businesses try not to kill competitors by  continually bring down price benchmarks. They sit down over a cup of coffee, discuss wallstreet, forex, economy and at the end of the day, they agree to fix prices mutually agreeable to everyone in the business. No wonder, Store A has virtually the same price as Store B and Store C.

Sorry, just remembered a quote -- “People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public.” - Adam Smith

In the end, the consumer has to pay higher prices. This is collusion, plain and simple, and goes against free trade. Sadly though, there are quite a few industries where this is the 'solution'...and that industry stagnates as there is minimal need to innovate.

While I sympathize with the plight of the established photographers, I believe that having a common 'benchmark' pricing does not help the photography industry, unless the end-consumer is guaranteed a certain degree/standard of quality -- maybe with that registered union/org could help?

Perhaps it would be better to educate the general public that you literally 'get what you pay for'? I remember a post by Deo a few months back, where he gave a quote to a couple for their wedding... while they initially accepted it, they opted to get a 'cheaper' photog... and ended up regretting it (as the cheaper photog was a total newbie with his DSLR). Maybe if they had seen that photog's portfolio (if any), then they would have made an informed decision.

Sorry, just throwing out some points to chew on. Not picking a fight, I'm just trying to see it from the consumers viewpoint.

It is part of the photographer's job to see more intensely than most people do. -Bill Brandt

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Re: Towards a Rate Guide for the Philippine Photography Industry
« Reply #19 on: February 07, 2011, 01:01:42 PM »

Sorry for reviving an old thread.

Has this ever been implemented?

:)

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