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Author Topic: Manual For Shooting Landscapes  (Read 49567 times)

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Offline elaehernandez

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Re: Manual For Shooting Landscapes
« Reply #80 on: May 22, 2011, 06:58:48 PM »
Thank you for sharing this sir.

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Re: Manual For Shooting Landscapes
« Reply #80 on: May 22, 2011, 06:58:48 PM »

Offline elaehernandez

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Re: Manual For Shooting Landscapes
« Reply #81 on: May 23, 2011, 03:46:10 PM »
NOTED  ;)

Offline cruzjoa

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Re: Manual For Shooting Landscapes
« Reply #82 on: July 03, 2011, 11:38:52 PM »
This is a timeless tips not only on shooting landscape but the whole Photography per se. Thanks for sharing and continue inspiring piphols.

Offline FredEstioko

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Re: Manual For Shooting Landscapes
« Reply #83 on: July 13, 2011, 03:28:19 PM »
I love shooting landscapes. I am very grateful for all the learnings that were shared in this thread.

Most of the time we seek photo opportunities and go for it. We travel to our destination and start shooting. In many cases, we refer to pictures we may have seen before and make our decision to make something better, to make something different from a different angle, perspective, lighting mode, even climate.

I have had the chance to go to Banawe several times and I always make it a point to shoot. In 3 separate occassions, I had 3 different photos. Planting season give you rice terraces that are gray; a month later, rice terraces are beautiful in green and during harvest time, the terraces are golden yellow. Probably, these are the information we need to note in our future endeavors -- when does rainy season starts, when do they start planting and when do they harvest, what month does the sun set directly in the middle of Manila Bay, when do you have the biggest waves in San Juan, La Union, when do the migratory birds start coming into Candaba swamps, etc.

Happy Shooting!!!

Offline Speedlight

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Re: Manual For Shooting Landscapes
« Reply #84 on: July 14, 2011, 03:48:28 PM »
1hr ago i typed in google "Pinoy Photography Forum" and got this site on 1st hit. I registered,  browsed the thread titles and look for something that would interest me. My last 15-20 mins was a learning experience. I was amazed of tons of information i got for my 1st hour on this forum.

Maraming salamat po.

Isang tanong lang po from newbie.
When you shot a vast landscape ano po ba ang angkop ng focus setting, manual po ba o automatic? Pangalawang tanong po, paano po ba ang tamang focusing para sharp ang foreground up to background?

Offline ekusonas

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Re: Manual For Shooting Landscapes
« Reply #85 on: July 14, 2011, 03:55:29 PM »
wow. purely tagalog ang sagot ni sir Mon ha..  ayos to.. It goes against the rules ng kabilang photog website na english only, pero makabayan....  makapag balik basa nga. [backread]..

Offline DarkestHour

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Re: Manual For Shooting Landscapes
« Reply #86 on: July 14, 2011, 07:33:40 PM »
thanks for sharing sir napaka informative
“Without ambition one starts nothing. Without work one finishes nothing. The prize will not be sent to you. You have to win it.”

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Offline budz_d_great

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Re: Manual For Shooting Landscapes
« Reply #87 on: July 14, 2011, 10:10:38 PM »
thanks for the tip! clicking print screen now!  :)
shoot shoot! and keep on shooting!

Offline darrellbaet

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Re: Manual For Shooting Landscapes
« Reply #88 on: July 19, 2011, 09:52:49 AM »
a very great advice for a newbie landscapist like me :D

Offline kidferio

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Re: Manual For Shooting Landscapes
« Reply #89 on: July 20, 2011, 04:05:25 PM »
This is very useful and informative...  Thanks for imparting your knowledge to us newbies, masters... :D

Offline JanMante

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Re: Manual For Shooting Landscapes
« Reply #90 on: July 23, 2011, 01:53:06 PM »
these threads are like gold mines, old and yet the value increases through time. tfs!
Entry Level Noob! :D

Offline champoy

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Re: Manual For Shooting Landscapes
« Reply #91 on: August 12, 2011, 07:37:54 PM »
thanks for sharing this nice thoughts  :D

Offline Omegatron

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Re: Manual For Shooting Landscapes
« Reply #92 on: September 01, 2011, 12:25:47 PM »
One time I woke up early to catch the sun rise.  When I got out to a good spot (still dark) I was surprised to find there were a lot of photographers already positioned at the spot I was planning to shoot. It was a good opportunity to make new friends and exchange tips.



that also happened to me last Penagbenga in Baguio.
I went to mines view park on a friday 5am and discovered the entrance up to the viewing area pitch black, as in using my cel's flash apps to light my way. reaching the viewing deck i noticed a lot of red dots which turned out to be like minded photogs catching the early rays of the sun. learned a tip or two from them too.

Offline jmrobles

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Re: Manual For Shooting Landscapes
« Reply #93 on: September 02, 2011, 11:05:44 AM »


Manual For Shooting Landscapes

I've been asked several times if I do workshops on landscapes and most people find it hard to believe I don't. I still consider myself an apprentice of the great outdoors.

Before anyone can be good at shooting awe-inspiring landscapes and vistas, one must be a true nature lover, adventurer and a mountaineer. Let me share to you a paraphrased version of Paulo Coehlo's Climbing Mountains which has been my inspiration in the pursuit of photographing compelling sceneries.


A] Choose what you want to shoot; landscapes, seascapes. Don’t pay attention to what other people say, such as “that one’s more beautiful” or “this one’s is normal”. You’ll be spending lots of energy and enthusiasm to reach your objective, so you’re the only one responsible and you should be sure of what you’re doing.

B] Know how to get close to it: sceneries are often seen from far off – beautiful, interesting, full of challenges. But what happens when we try to draw closer? Roads run all around them, flowers grow between you and your objective, what seemed so clear on the map is tough in real life. So try all the paths and all the tracks until eventually one day you’re standing in front of the sceneries that you yearn to reach.

C] Learn from someone who has already photographed the scene: no matter how unique you feel, there is always someone who has had the same dream before you and ended up leaving marks that can make your journey easier; places to peg your tripod, must-have filters, the best season and time to shoot. The shoot is yours, so is the responsibility, but don’t forget that the experience of others can help a lot.

D] When seen up close, dangers are controllable: when you begin to shoot the sceneries of your dreams, pay attention to the surroundings. There are cliffs, of course. There are almost imperceptible cracks in the mountain rock. There are stones so polished by storms that they have become as slippery as ice. But if you know where you are placing each footstep, you will notice the traps and how to get around them.

E] Great landscapes and seascapes changes abruptly and constantly, so enjoy it: of course, you have to have an objective in mind – to shoot it on its best form, while you are present. But as you go along, more things can be seen, and it’s no bother to stop now and again and enjoy the panorama around you. At every frame photographed, you can see a little further, so use this to discover things that you still had yet to photograph.

F] Respect your body: you can only wake up so early if you give your body the attention it deserves. You have all the time that life grants you, as long as you walk without demanding what can’t be granted. If you go too fast you will grow tired and give up half way there. If you go too slow, night will fall and you will be lost. Enjoy the sceneries, take snaps of details, patterns, leading lines and textures that nature generously offers you, but remember to rest.

G] Respect your soul: don’t keep repeating “I’m going to shoot this”. Your soul already knows that, what it needs is to use each journey to be able to observe the diverse characteristics of a landscape. An obsession does not help you at all to reach your objective, and even ends up taking the pleasure out of the shoot. But pay attention: also, don’t keep saying “it’s better than I thought”, because that will make you lose your inner strength and desire to learn.

H] Be prepared to walk one kilometer more: the way up to the top of the mountain or a shoreline is always longer than you think. Don’t fool yourself, the moment will arrive when what seemed so near is still very far. But since you were prepared to go beyond, this is not really a problem and  the images will be very rewarding.

I] Be happy when you finished your shoot: cry, clap your hands, shout to the four winds that you did it, let the wind - the wind is always blowing up there - purify your mind, refresh your tired and sweaty feet, open your eyes, clean the dust from your heart. It feels so good, what was just a dream before, a distant vision, is now part of your life, and you captured it!

J] Make a promise: now that you have discovered a force that you were not even aware of, tell yourself that from now on you will use this force for the rest of your days. Preferably, also promise to discover other place for landscape, and set off on another adventure.

L] Share your photos: yes, and tell your story! Give your example. Tell everyone that it’s possible, and other people will then have the courage to shoot excellent landscapes.


Thanks Sir for sharing this...

Offline baboyako

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Re: Manual For Shooting Landscapes
« Reply #94 on: October 06, 2011, 02:01:08 PM »
Thanks for the inspiring words! Inspires me to go out and shoot!
hello

Offline kimwayne

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Re: Manual For Shooting Landscapes
« Reply #95 on: October 20, 2011, 10:55:26 AM »
hello po,


ano po yon mgandang third party lens for landscape.Sorry,i am newbie.i have two lens as of now,nikkon 18-200 and 50mm 1.4.

Offline Czzz

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Re: Manual For Shooting Landscapes
« Reply #96 on: October 20, 2011, 11:50:37 PM »
Sir Mon question lang po. Im having a hard time landscaping with the 10-22 because of the distortion. Can you give advice on controlling this and if what FL ang usually ginagamit sa landscaping? Medjo ang hirap mag compose sa 10mm, Im trying to advance but most of my shots arent what you would say good.
Play with light, and you'll eventually get it right
-Me :P

Offline jagger

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Re: Manual For Shooting Landscapes
« Reply #97 on: November 01, 2011, 09:39:30 PM »
Thank you very much Sir for sharing  :-* .... di ko na matandaan kung ilang beses ko ng binabalik-balikan ang thread na ito. Malaking tulong sa katulad kong gustong matuto sa field ng Landscape photography!
Joseph Tan is my mentor and Google is my tutor.

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Offline elec_debugger

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Re: Manual For Shooting Landscapes
« Reply #98 on: November 06, 2011, 04:57:09 PM »
After joining the Pipho 6 event, I was inspired by the speakers but one that grabbed my interest the most is yung talk about Landscape so naghanap ako ng ganitong topic dito sa forum. Base sa title ng thread na ito, I was expecting technical stuff but after reading the posts, I did get a different one (a better one that is..  :) ). Kung ang photography ay may mind and soul, I would say this manual is for the latter.
I PRINT the IMAGES to create PHOTOS

Offline chapster

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Re: Manual For Shooting Landscapes
« Reply #99 on: November 26, 2011, 09:23:40 PM »


Manual For Shooting Landscapes

I've been asked several times if I do workshops on landscapes and most people find it hard to believe I don't. I still consider myself an apprentice of the great outdoors.

Before anyone can be good at shooting awe-inspiring landscapes and vistas, one must be a true nature lover, adventurer and a mountaineer. Let me share to you a paraphrased version of Paulo Coehlo's Climbing Mountains which has been my inspiration in the pursuit of photographing compelling sceneries.


A] Choose what you want to shoot; landscapes, seascapes. Don’t pay attention to what other people say, such as “that one’s more beautiful” or “this one’s is normal”. You’ll be spending lots of energy and enthusiasm to reach your objective, so you’re the only one responsible and you should be sure of what you’re doing.

B] Know how to get close to it: sceneries are often seen from far off – beautiful, interesting, full of challenges. But what happens when we try to draw closer? Roads run all around them, flowers grow between you and your objective, what seemed so clear on the map is tough in real life. So try all the paths and all the tracks until eventually one day you’re standing in front of the sceneries that you yearn to reach.

C] Learn from someone who has already photographed the scene: no matter how unique you feel, there is always someone who has had the same dream before you and ended up leaving marks that can make your journey easier; places to peg your tripod, must-have filters, the best season and time to shoot. The shoot is yours, so is the responsibility, but don’t forget that the experience of others can help a lot.

D] When seen up close, dangers are controllable: when you begin to shoot the sceneries of your dreams, pay attention to the surroundings. There are cliffs, of course. There are almost imperceptible cracks in the mountain rock. There are stones so polished by storms that they have become as slippery as ice. But if you know where you are placing each footstep, you will notice the traps and how to get around them.

E] Great landscapes and seascapes changes abruptly and constantly, so enjoy it: of course, you have to have an objective in mind – to shoot it on its best form, while you are present. But as you go along, more things can be seen, and it’s no bother to stop now and again and enjoy the panorama around you. At every frame photographed, you can see a little further, so use this to discover things that you still had yet to photograph.

F] Respect your body: you can only wake up so early if you give your body the attention it deserves. You have all the time that life grants you, as long as you walk without demanding what can’t be granted. If you go too fast you will grow tired and give up half way there. If you go too slow, night will fall and you will be lost. Enjoy the sceneries, take snaps of details, patterns, leading lines and textures that nature generously offers you, but remember to rest.

G] Respect your soul: don’t keep repeating “I’m going to shoot this”. Your soul already knows that, what it needs is to use each journey to be able to observe the diverse characteristics of a landscape. An obsession does not help you at all to reach your objective, and even ends up taking the pleasure out of the shoot. But pay attention: also, don’t keep saying “it’s better than I thought”, because that will make you lose your inner strength and desire to learn.

H] Be prepared to walk one kilometer more: the way up to the top of the mountain or a shoreline is always longer than you think. Don’t fool yourself, the moment will arrive when what seemed so near is still very far. But since you were prepared to go beyond, this is not really a problem and  the images will be very rewarding.

I] Be happy when you finished your shoot: cry, clap your hands, shout to the four winds that you did it, let the wind - the wind is always blowing up there - purify your mind, refresh your tired and sweaty feet, open your eyes, clean the dust from your heart. It feels so good, what was just a dream before, a distant vision, is now part of your life, and you captured it!

J] Make a promise: now that you have discovered a force that you were not even aware of, tell yourself that from now on you will use this force for the rest of your days. Preferably, also promise to discover other place for landscape, and set off on another adventure.

L] Share your photos: yes, and tell your story! Give your example. Tell everyone that it’s possible, and other people will then have the courage to shoot excellent landscapes.


Maraming salamat...

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